Nation

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notmartha
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Nation

Post by notmartha » Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:43 am

Also see SOCIETY and PHYLE

BIBLE

KJV References
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Anti-Thought-Control Dictionary created by American Christian Ministries
http://benwilliamslibrary.com/dictionary_set.html
NATION

Controlled Meaning:
A body of people under one government. A union of "states" or "provinces" under central rule.

Correct Definition:
A tribe or race of people (as the Cherokee Nation). From the Latin "natus" – to be born. Nationality should designate race or tribe. "Nation" is not the preferred term for The United States because its citizens are not racially alike. The term as been stretched, however, to mean the land and the people who are born in the land.
NATIONALISM

Controlled Meaning:
The political doctrine of national independence, putting national interests above other interests or powers.

True Meaning:
The doctrine of asserting the power of the nation above all other interests, including God's.
Nationalists condemn Internationalism (e.g., The United Nations) as if national sovereignty would cure all evil. Statists want sovereignty at the state level. Some folks want sovereignty at the local level (county, city, etc). These arguments are all relative in that they each seek sovereignty at their various levels. This is a critical point in that 'sovereigns" make law, and whoever/whatever makes law is god. This, "sovereigns" are "gods."

Yahweh commanded Israel to not accept other gods. Recognizing another sovereign (i.e., lawmaker) is idolatry ... at the national, state, or local level. The clear intent of God's Law is that no other lawmakers are allowed! Law can be interpreted (not created) and applied by elders (not by state-appointed judges), and enforced by the people (not by hireling cops): see Dt. 13:9; 17; 21:18-23; Nu. 35.

DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
Nation

1. A body of people inhabiting the same country, or united under the same sovereign or government; as the English nation; the French nation. It often happens that many nations are subject to one government; in which case, the word nation usually denotes a body of people speaking the same language, or a body that has formerly been under a distinct government, but has been conquered, or incorporated with a larger nation. Thus the empire of Russia comprehends many nations, as did formerly the Roman and Persian empires. Nation, as its etymology imports, originally denoted a family or race of men descended from a common progenitor, like tribe, but by emigration, conquest and intermixture of men of different families, this distinction is in most countries lost.

2. A great number, by way of emphasis

Nationality

National character; also, the quality of being national, or strongly attached to one’s own nation.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
Nations

1. Nations or states are independent bodies politic; societies of men united together for the purpose of promoting their mutual safety and advantage by the joint efforts of their combined strength.

2. But every combination of men who govern themselves, independently of all others, will not be considered a nation; a body of pirates, for example, who govern themselves, are not a nation. To constitute a nation another ingredient is required. The body thus formed must respect other nations in general, and each of their members in particular. Such a society has her affairs and her interests; she deliberates and takes resolutions in common; thus becoming a moral person who possesses an understanding and will peculiar to herself, and is susceptible of obligations and rights. Vattel, Prelim. §1, 2; 5 Pet. S. C. R. 52.

3. It belongs to the government to declare whether they will consider a colony which has thrown off the yoke of the mother country as an independent state; and until the government have decided on the question, courts of justice are bound to consider the ancient state of things as remaining unchanged. 1 Johns. Ch. R. 543; 13 John. 141, 561; see 5 Pet. S. C. R. 1; 1 Kent, Com 21; and Body Politic; State.

Nationality

1. The state of a person in relation to the nation in which he was born.
2. A man retains his nationality of origin during bis minority, but, as in the case of his domicil of origin, he may change his nationality upon attaining full age; he cannot, however, renounce his allegiance without permission of the government. See Citizen; Domicil; Expatriation; Naturalization; Foelix, Du Dr. Intern. prive, n. 26; 8 Cranch, 263; 8 Cranch, 253; Chit. Law of Nat. 31 2 Gall. 485; 1 Gall. 545.
Cyclopaedia of Political Science, Political Economy, and of the Political History of the United States, vol. 2, John Joseph Lalor, 1881
NATION, Definition of.

The words nation and people are frequently used as synonyms, but there is a great difference between them. A nation is an aggregation of men speaking the same language, having the same customs, and endowed with certain moral qualities which distinguish them from other groups of a like nature. It would follow from this definition that a nation is destined to form only one state, and that it constitutes one indivisible whole. Nevertheless, the history of every age presents us with nations divided into several states. Thus, Italy was for centuries divided among several different governments. The same was the case, and in a measure is still the case, with Germany. The people is the collection of all citizens without distinction of rank or order. All men living under the same government compose the people of the state. In relation to the state, the citizens constitute the people; in relation to the human race, they constitute the nation. A free nation is one not subject to a foreign government, whatever be the constitution of the state; a people is free when all the citizens can participate in a certain measure in the direction and in the examination of public affairs. Empires, such as the Roman empire was, such as the Russian empire and the Austrian empire of to day are, may therefore, comprise a great number of different nations, but they are composed, in reality, of only one people. Notwithstanding the diversity of nationalities united under the government of the house of Hapsburg, there is one Austrian people, since the constitution of 1859 granted certain political rights to the population. The people is the political body brought into existence by community of laws, and the people may perish with these laws. The nation is the moral body independent of political revolutions, because it is constituted by inborn qualities which render it indissoluble. The state is the people organized into a political body.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
NATION.

A people, or aggregation of men, existing in the form of an organized jural society, inhabiting a distinct portion of the earth, speaking the same language, using the same customs, possessing historic continuity, and distinguished from other like groups by their racial origin and characteristics, and generally, but not necessarily, living under the same government and sovereignty.

Besides the element of autonomy or self-government, that is, the independence of the community as a whole from the interference of any foreign power in its affairs or any subjection to such power, it is further necessary to the constitution of a nation that it should be an organized jural society, that is, both governing its own members by regular laws, and defining and protecting their rights, and respecting the rights and duties which attach to it as a constituent member of the family of nations. Such a society, says Vattel, has her affairs and her interests; she deliberates and takes resolutions in common; thus becoming a moral person, who possesses an understanding and will peculiar to her self, and is susceptible of obligations and rights. Vattel, 55 1, 2.

The words “nation” and “people " are frequently used as synonyms, but there is a great difference between them. A nation is an aggregation of men speaking the same language, having the same customs, and endowed with certain moral qualities which distinguish them from other groups of a like nature. It would follow from this definition that a nation is destined to form only one state, and that it constitutes one indivisible whole. Nevertheless, the history of every age presents us with nations divided into several states. Thus, Italy was for centuries divided among several different governments. The people is the collection of all citizens without distinction of rank or order. All men living under the same government compose the people of the state. In relation to the state, the citizens constitute the people; in relation to the human race, they constitute the nation. A free nation is one not subject to a foreign government, whatever be the constitution of the state; a people is free when all the citizens can participate
in a certain measure in the direction and in the examination of public affairs. The people is the political body brought into existence by community of laws, and the people may perish with these laws. The nation 'is the moral body, independent of political revolutions, because it is constituted by inborn qualities which render it indissoluble. The state is the people organized into a political body. Lalor, Pol. Enc. s. o

In American constitutional law the word “state” is applied to the several members of the American Union, while the Word “nation” is applied to the whole body of the people embraced within the jurisdiction of the federal government. Cooley, Const. Lim. 1. See 7 Wall. 720.

NATIONALITY.

That quality or character which arises from the fact of a person's belonging to a nation or state. Nationality determines the political status of the individual, especially with reference to allegiance; while domicile determines his civil status. Nationality arises either by birth or by naturalization. According to Savigny. “nationality” is also used as opposed to “territoriality,” for the purpose of distinguishing the case of a nation having no national territory; e. g., the Jews. 8 Sav. Syst. §346; Westl. l’riv. Int. Law, 5.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
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Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th (1979) and 6th (1991) Editions
Nation

A people, or aggregation of men, existing in the form of an organized jural society, usually inhabiting a distinct portion of the earth, speaking the same language, using the same customs, possessing historic continuity, and distinguished from other like groups by their racial origin and characteristics, and generally, but not necessarily, living under the same government and sovereignty.

Nationality

That quality or character which arises from the fact of a person’s belonging to a nation or state. Nationality determines the political status of the individual, especially with reference to allegiance; while domicile determines his civil status. Nationality arises either by birth or by naturalization.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 7th Edition
Nation

1. A large group of people having a common origin, language, and tradition and usu. constituting a political entity. When a nation is coincident with a state, the term nation-state is often used. – Also termed nationality.

“The nearest we can get to a definition is to say that a nation is a group of people bound together by common history, common sentiment and traditions, and usually (though not always, as for example, Belgium or Switzerland) by common heritage. A state, on the other hand, is a society of men united under one government. These two forms of society are not necessarily coincident. A single nation may be divided into several states, and conversely a single state may comprise several nations or parts of nations.” John Salmond, Jurisprudence 136 (Glanville L. Williams ed., 10th ed. 1947).

2. A community of people inhabiting a defined territory and organized under an independent government; a sovereign political state.

Nationality

1. NATION

2. The relationship between a citizen of a nation and the nation itself, customarily involving allegiance by the citizen and protection by the state; membership in a nation.

3. The formal relationship between a ship and the nation under whose flag the ship sails.
QUOTES

Frederick Douglass:
The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous.
Adolf Hitler:
It is thus necessary that the individual should finally come to realize that his own ego is of no importance in comparison with the existence of the nation, that the position of the individual is conditioned solely by the interests of the nation as a whole.

George Washington:
There can be no greater error than to expect or calculate upon real favors from nation to nation.
Alexander Solzhenitsyn:
Woe to that nation whose literature is cut short by the intrusion of force. This is not merely interference with freedom of the press but the sealing up of a nation’s heart, the excision of its memory.
Dr. Ravi Zacharias:
It is a mindless philosophy that assumes that one's private beliefs have nothing to do with public office. Does it make sense to entrust those who are immoral in private with the power to determine the nation's moral issues and, indeed, its destiny? .... The duplicitous soul of a leader can only make a nation more sophisticated in evil.
Patrick Henry:
Bad men cannot make good citizens. It is impossible that a nation of infidels or idolaters should be a nation of freemen. It is when a people forget God that tyrants forge their chains. A vitiated state of morals, a corrupted public conscience, is incompatible with freedom. No free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue; and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.
Sir Winston Churchill:
A nation that forgets its past is doomed to repeat it.
Anthony Quayle:
To understand a man, you must know his memories. The same is true of a nation.
Benjamin Franklin:
A nation of well informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the region of ignorance that tyranny begins.
Thomas Paine:
There are two distinct classes of men in the nation, those who pay taxes, and those who receive and live upon the taxes.
Thomas Jefferson:
If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.
Theodore Roosevelt:
All constitutions, those of the States no less than that of the nation, are designed, and must be interpreted and administered so as to fit human rights.

Alexis de Tocqueville:
All those who seek to destroy the liberties of a democratic nation ought to know that war is the surest and shortest means to accomplish it.

Bill Clinton:
There are a lot of very brilliant people who believe that the nation-state is fast becoming a relic of the past.
Adolf Hitler:
Without law and order our nation cannot survive.
W. Somerset Maugham:
If a nation values anything more than freedom, it will lose its freedom; and the irony of it is that if it is comfort or money that it values more, it will lose that, too.
MISC.

As of 2008, the U.S. still recognizes each of the several States as its own nation.

U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/stylemanual/20 ... txt-5.html
Nationalities, etc.

5.22. The table beginning on page 233 shows forms to be used for nouns and adjectives denoting nationality.
5.23. In designating the natives of the several States, the following forms will be used.
Alabamian
Alaskan
Arizonan
Arkansan
Californian
coloradan
Connecticuter
Delawarean
Floridian
Georgian
Hawaiian
Idahoan
Illinoisan
Indianian
Iowan
Kansan
Kentuckian
Louisianian
Mainer
Marylander
Massachusettsan
Michiganian
Minnesotan
Mississippian
Missourian
Montanan
Nebraskan
Nevadan
New Hampshirite
New Jerseyan
New Mexican
New Yorker
North Carolinian
North Dakotan
Ohioan
Oklahoman
Oregonian
Pennsylvanian
Rhode Islander
South Carolinian
South Dakotan
Tennessean
Texan
Utahn
Vermonter
Virginian
Washingtonian
West Virginian
Wisconsinite
Wyomingite
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