Ens and Entity

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notmartha
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Ens and Entity

Post by notmartha » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:45 pm

KJV References

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Systematic Theology, Charles Hodge, 1871-3
When we say we can define God, all that is meant is, that we can analyze the idea of God as it lies in our mind; or, that we can state the class of beings of which He belongs, and the attributes by which He is distinguished from all other beings. Thus, in the simple definition, God is ens perfectissimum, the word ens designates Him as a being, not a idea, but as that which has real, objective existence; and absolute perfection distinguishes Him from all other beings. The objection to this and most other definitions of God is, that they do not bring out with sufficient fulness the contents of the idea. This, objection bears against such definitions as the following: Ens absolutum, the self-existent, independent being;
Webster’s Dictionary, 1828
ENS, noun [L. ens. Part. Present of esse, to be]
Entity; being; existence. Among the old chimists, the power, virtue or efficacy, which certain substances exert on our bodies; or the things which are supposed to contain all the qualities or virtues of the ingredients they are drawn from, in little room.


EN'TITY, noun [Low Latin entitas; FR. Entite; Sp. Entidad; It. Entita; from ens, esse, to be.]
1. Being; existence.
2. A real being, or species of being.

BE'ING, participle present tense [See Be.] Existing in a certain state.

SPECIES, noun spe'shiz. [Latin from specio, to see. See Special.]
3. In logic, a special idea, corresponding to the specific distinctions of things in nature.
4. Sort; kind; in a loose sense; as a species of low cunning in the world; as a species of generosity; a species of cloth.
5. Appearance to the senses; visible or sensible representation. An apparent diversity between the species visible and audible, is that the visible doth not mingle in the medium, but the audible doth. The species of letters illuminated with indigo and violet. [Little used.]

RE'AL, adjective [Low Latin realis. The Latin res and Eng. thing coincide exactly with the Heb. a word, a thing, an event.]
4. Relating to things, not to persons; not personal.
10 Op. Atty.-Gen. 426, 427, December 27, 1862
"I observe, in the first place, that the Congress can admit new States into this Union, but it cannot form States. Congress has no creative power in that respect, and cannot admit into this Union any territory, district, or other political entity, less than a State. And such State must exist, as a separate independent body politic, before it can be admitted under that clause of the Constitution, and there is no other clause. The new State which Congress may admit, by virtue of that clause, does not owe its existence by the fact of admission, and does not begin to exist coeval with that fact; for, if that be so, then Congress makes the State; for no power Congress can admit a State into the Union. And that result, (i.e., the making of the State by Congress,) would falsify the universal and fundamental principle of this country–that a free, independent American State can be made only by the people, its component members, Congress has no power to make States."

The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895

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Black's Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1899
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Municipality of Ponce v. Roman Catholic Apostolic Church in Porto Rico (1907)
"It is the settled law of this court, that a dedication to a public or charitable use may exist, even where there is no specific corporate entity to take as grantee. Werlein v. New Orleans, 177 U.S. 390, 401, and see Beatty v. Kurtz, 2 Pet. 566."
American Law and Procedure, Volume 13, pp. 137-162 (1910)
"A moments reflection enables one to see that man and person cannot be synonymous, for there cannot be an artificial man, though there are artificial persons. Thus the conclusion is easily reached that the law itself often creates an entity or a being which is called a person; the law cannot create an artificial man, but it can and frequently does invest him with artificial attributes; this is his personality that is to say, the man-person; and abstract persons, which are fictitious and which have no existence except in law; that is to say, those which are purely legal conceptions or creations."
Webster's New Twentieth Century Dictionary, Unabridged, 1969

ENTITY. n.; pl. entities, [LL. from L. ens, entis, being. ppr. of esse, to be.]
1. Being; existence.
2. A thing that has real and individual existence, in reality, or in the mind; anything real in itself. 3. Essence; essential nature. [Rare.]
Funk & Wagnalls Standard College Dictionary, 1977
Ens

In scholastic philosophy, the abstract conception of being.

Entity

1. Something existing objectively or in the mind; an actual or conceivable being.

2. Existence as opposed to nonexistence; being.

3. Essence; substance.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition, 1979
Ens legis

A creature of the law; an artificial being, as contrasted with a natural person. Applied to corporations, considered as deriving their existence entirely from the law.

Entity

A real being; existence. An organization or being that possesses separate existence for tax purposes. Examples would be corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. The accounting entity for which accounting statements are prepared may not be the same as the entity defined by law.

An existence apart, such as a corporation in relation to its stockholders.

Entity includes person, estate, trust, governmental unit. Bankruptcy Act §101 (14)

Legal Entity

Legal existence. An entity, other than a natural person, who has sufficient existence in legal contemplation that it can function legally, be sued or sue and make decisions through agents as in the case of corporations.

Black’s Law Dictionary, abridged 6th Edition, 1991
Entity

A real being; existence. An organization or being that possesses separate existence for tax purposes. Examples would be corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. The accounting entity for which accounting statements are prepared may not be the same as the entity defined by law.

“Entity” includes corporation and foreign corporation; not-for-profit corporation; profit and not-for-profit unincorporated association; business trust, estate, partnership, trust, and two or more persons having a joint or common economic interest; and state, United States, and foreign government.

Legal Entity

Legal existence. An entity, other than a natural person, who has sufficient existence in legal contemplation that it can function legally, be sued or sue and make decisions through agents as in the case of corporations.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 7th Edition, 1999
Ens legis

A creature of the law; an artificial being, as opposed to a natural person. The term describes a corporation, which derives its existence entirely from the law.

Entity

An organization (such as a business or a governmental unit) that has a legal identity apart from its members.

Corporate entity – A corporation’s status as an organization existing independently of its shareholders. As a separate entity, a corporation can, in its own name, sue and be sued, lend and borrow money, and buy, sell, lease, and mortgage its property.

Public entity – A governmental entity, such as a state government or one of its political subdivisions.

Legal Entity

A body other than a natural person, that can function legally, sue or be sued, and make decisions through agents. A typical example is a corporation.
WEX Legal Dictionary
Entity

A person or organization possessing separate and distinct legal rights, such as an individual, partnership, or corporation. An entity can, among other things, own property, engage in business, enter into contracts, pay taxes, sue and be sued.

Entity Liability

The concept of entity liability allows a corporation to be held liable for the criminal misdeeds of its agents if (1) the agent is acting within the actual or apparent scope of their employment or authority and (2) if the agents intend, at least in part, to some way benefit the corporation through their actions. The corporation can still be held liable for their agents’ criminal misdeeds or actions even if the agents’ actions are contrary to corporate policy or directly disregard express orders of the corporation. This rule was established in New York Central and Hudson River Railroad v. United States, 212 U.S. 481 (1909), where the court decided to extend the tort doctrine of respondeat superior to criminal cases, establishing a form of corporate criminal liability for actions of corporation’s agents

Artificial Person

An entity established by law and given at least some legal rights and duties of a human being. Corporations are the most common types of artificial persons.

Ludwig von Mises said:
The market is not a place, a thing, or a collective entity. It is a process.
Ayn Rand said:
...there is no such entity as 'the public' - since the public is merely a number of individuals - the idea that 'the public interest' supersedes private interests and rights can have but one meaning: that the interests and rights of some individuals take precedence over the interests and rights of others.
James A. Traficant, Jr. said:
Mr. Speaker, we are now in Chapter 11... Members of Congress are official trustees presiding over the greatest reorganization of any bankrupt entity in world history.
From The Words of His Kingdom and the words of the world compared:
Now there are, believe it or not, entities created by man. Corporations, for example, are known as 'persons' created by the government. They are created on a piece of paper and brought into existence by the government. To differentiate between those created by God and those artificial persons created by the government, those created by the government have their names spelled in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. This lets others know that this person does not have a soul, but this is a fictitious entity created for the purpose of making a profit. Corporations are engaged in capital, thus, by spelling incorporated names in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, this shows the world that they are involved in capital, in profit.
When you sign a piece of paper to a name in all capital letters, you stand as surety for that fictitious entity created by the State. Similar to how a man stands as surety for his corporation (meaning, if the corporation does something wrong, the man will go to court and answer to the charges against his corporation). This is what you do when you stand as surety for that fictitious name on that license issued by the State. But the Scripture is clear that we are not to stand as surety (Proverbs 6:1-2; 11:15, Romans 13:8), At 2 Kings 18:23,31, the people refused to stand as surety (pledges) for their king (government). Remember, the courts have jurisdiction over the 'person' (fictitious name, corporation, etc.), but not the 'surety', until the two become one flesh by merging together.
Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. 2 Tim 2:15
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