Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Discussion on creating and maintaining Conflicts of Law
bondservant
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Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by bondservant » Sun Oct 27, 2013 8:23 pm

[quote]If you are afraid of the persecution that Lawful Christian liberty may bring, be of good cheer, because our Lord and Savior promises that you will be tried and tested, and that He will be there with you during these times. I have been arrested and before the courts. But here I am, a free man. It's scary at first, but you soon realize the POWER of YHWH's Word. I know that realization brought me to my knees, gave me goose bumps from the feeling, and tears of joy to my eyes. If you want to chase that feeling you had when first converted... this is it!

Praise YHWH and His Word,/quote]

Hello Thomas

I agree with the above quote, my mind is prepared but it would be nice to have another bondman alongside for encouragement. Know of anyone near orange county calif?
Thomas Jeffrey
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Joined: Wed May 08, 2013 7:47 pm

Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by Thomas Jeffrey » Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:43 pm

bondservant,

I'm in Riverside county. Send a PM to me with some contact info and let's talk.

Blessings,
Thomas
bondservant
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Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by bondservant » Sun Nov 03, 2013 4:39 pm

Hi Thomas,

I just saw your response. I'm sorry i'm responding so late.

I cannot PM you. It's telling me i haven't been on the board long enough.. But you can contact the administrator Gregory and tell him it's ok to give you my email address.

Thanks so much
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editor
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Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by editor » Mon Nov 04, 2013 10:44 pm

Done.

Bondservant, I think you're about one post away from full privileges :-)
--
Editor
Lawfulpath.com
bondservant
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Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 2:24 pm

Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by bondservant » Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:19 pm

Thank you editor.

I'm still trying to figure how it all works.

I do have a question...where are all the forerunners who've started this good work and who are overcomers, to cheer the others who are running this race?

Thank you for the forum editor.
Thomas Jeffrey
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed May 08, 2013 7:47 pm

Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by Thomas Jeffrey » Wed Nov 06, 2013 1:48 am

I just received the PM notification. Thanks, Gregory, for putting that through.

Bondservant, I'll check the PM and we can exchange e-mail addresses.

Many Blessings,
Thomas
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notmartha
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Re: Christian Liberty and Avoiding Bondage

Post by notmartha » Fri Dec 20, 2013 1:28 pm

Thomas Jeffrey wrote:“Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? And what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in [them]; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean [thing]; and I will receive you, And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty.” 2 Cor. 6:14-18

Perhaps two of the more difficult aspects of our walk with Christ are the ideas of Christian liberty and the yokes of bondage as described and taught in scripture.



Churches,inc. often use these verses in regards to a marriage union, leaving out the entire context of the admonishment. I broke down these verses to shed light and maybe break any dissonance.

2 Corinthians 6:14-18 says:

"Be ye not unequally yoked(1) together with unbelievers(a): for what fellowship(2) hath righteousness with unrighteousness(b)? and what communion(3) hath light with darkness(c)? And what concord(4) hath Christ with Belial(d)? or what part(5) hath he that believeth with an infidel(e)? And what agreement(6) hath the temple of God with idols(f)? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you, And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty."

So, we as believers, righteous, light, and the sons and daughters of the Lord Almighty should “be ye not” or take part in:

(1) “Yoked”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: The words “unequally yoked” are translated from #2086 heterozugeo {het-er-od-zoog-eh'-o}, a compound of #2087 heteros {het'-er-os} and #2218 zugos {dzoo-gos'}; To come under an unequal or different yoke, to be unequally yoked; to have fellowship with one who is not an equal: 2Cor 6:14,where the apostle is forbidding Christians to have intercourse with idolaters;

#2087 - another, other, one not of the same nature, form, class, kind, different
#2218 - a yoke; metaph., used of any burden or bondage as that of slavery;

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary: These words in the Hebrew are both used figuratively of severe bondage, or affliction, or subjection (Lev. 26:13; 1 Kings 12:4; Isa. 47:6; Lam. 1:14; 3:27). In the New Testament the word "yoke" is also used to denote servitude (Matt. 11:29, 30; Acts 15:10; Gal. 5:1).

From Smith’s Dictionary of the Bible: A symbol of subjection and servitude.

From Webster’s 1828: A mark of servitude; slavery; bondage; a bond of connection;


(2) “Fellowship”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #3352 metoche {met-okh-ay'}, meaning a sharing, communion, fellowship;

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary: Of saints with one another, in duties; in ordinances; in grace, love, joy, etc.; mutual interest, spiritual and temporal; in sufferings; and in glory.

From Webster’s 1828: 1. Companionship; society; consort; mutual association of persons on equal and friendly terms; familiar intercourse; 2. Association; confederacy; combination; 3. Partnership; joint interest; 4. Company; a state of being together; 7. Communion; 8. …the rule of proportions, by which the accounts of partners in business are adjusted, so that each partner may have a share of gain or sustain a share of loss, in proportion to his part of the stock.

From Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition: “Fellow” – a partaker or sharer of; one with whom we consort; one joined with another in some legal status or relation; a member of a college or corporate body;


(3) “Communion”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #2842 koinonia {koy-nohn-ee'-ah}, meaning fellowship, association, community, communion, joint participation, intercourse; the share which one has in anything, participation; intercourse, fellowship, intimacy; a gift jointly contributed, a collection, a contribution, as exhibiting an embodiment and proof of fellowship;

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary: fellowship with God; between Christ and his people; by the Spirit; of believers with one another;

From Webster’s 1828: Fellowship; intercourse between two persons or more; interchange of transactions, or offices; a state of giving and receiving; agreement; concord;


(4) “Concord”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #4857 sumphonesis {soom-fo'-nay-sis}, meaning concord; agreement;

From Webster’s 1828: 1. Agreement between persons; union in opinions, sentiments, views or interests; peace; harmony. 2. Agreement between things; suitableness; harmony. 4. A compact; an agreement by stipulation; treaty. 5. In law, an agreement between the parties in a fine, made by leave of the court. This is an acknowledgement from the deforciants that the land in question is the right of the complainant.

From Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition: An agreement between two persons, one of whom has a right to action against the other, settling what amends shall be made for the breach or wrong. A compromise or an accord.

From Bouvier’s Dictionary of Law, 1856: estates, conveyances, practice. An agreement or supposed agreement between the parties in levying a fine of lands, in which the deforciant (or he who keeps the other out of possession,) acknowledges that the lands in question, are the right of the complainant; and from the acknowledgment or recognition of right thus made, the party who levies the fine is called the cognisor, and the person to whom it is levied, the cognisee.


(5) “Part”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #3310 meris {mer-ece'}, meaning a part as distinct from the whole; an assigned part, a portion, share.

From Webster’s 1828: 1. A portion, piece or fragment separated from a whole thing; 2. A portion or quantity of a thing not separated in fact, but considered or mentioned by itself. 6. A member; 9. That which falls to each in division; share; 11. Share; concern; interest; 14. Share of labor, action or influence; particular office or business.

From Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition: An integral portion, something essentially belonging to a larger whole; that which together with another or others makes up a whole. A portion, share, or purport.


(6) “Agreement”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #4783 sugkatathesis {soong-kat-ath'-es-is} meaning a putting together or joint deposit (of votes), hence approval, assent, agreement.

From Webster’s 1828: 1. Concord; harmony; conformity. 2. Union of opinions or sentiments; 3. Resemblance; conformity; similitude. 4. Union of minds in regard to a transfer of interest; bargain; compact; contract; stipulation.

From Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition: A coming together of minds; a coming together in opinion or determination; the coming together in accord of two minds on a given proposition. In law, a concord of understanding and intention between two or more parties with respect to the effect upon their relative rights and duties, of certain past or future facts or performances. The consent of two or more persons concurring respecting the transmission of some property, right, or benefits, with the view of contracting an obligation, a mutual obligation.

The act of two or more persons, who unite in expressing a mutual and common purpose, with the view of altering their rights and obligations. The union of two or more minds in a thing done or to be done; a mutual assent to do a thing. A compact between parties who are thereby subjected to the obligation or to whom the contemplated right is thereby secured.

From Bouvier’s Dictionary of Law, 1856: contract. The consent of two or more persons concurring, respecting the transmission of some property, right or benefit, with a view of contracting an obligation. Bac. Ab. h.t.; Com. Dig. h.t.; Vin. Ab. h.t.; Plowd. 17; 1 Com. Contr. 2; 5 East's R. 16. It will be proper to consider, 1, the requisites of an agreement; 2, the kinds of agreements; 3, how they are annulled.
2. 1. To render an agreement complete six things must concur; there must be, 1, a person able to contract; 2, a person able to be contracted with; 3, a thing to be contracted for; 4, a lawful consideration, or quid pro quo; 5, words to express the agreement; 6, the assent of the contracting parties. Plowd. 161; Co. Litt. 35, b.
3. 2. As to their form, agreements are of two kinds; 1, by parol, or, in writing, as contradistinguished from specialties; 2, by specialty, or under seal. In relation to their performance, agreements are executed or executory. An agreement is said to be executed when two or more persons make over their respective rights in a thing to one another, and thereby change the property therein, either presently and at once, or at a future time, upon some event that shall give it full effect, without either party trusting to the other; as where things are bought, paid for and delivered. Executory agreements, in the ordinary acceptation of the term, are such contracts as rest on articles, memorandums, parol promises, or undertakings, and the like, to be performed in future, or which are entered into preparatory to more solemn and formal alienations of property. Powel on Cont. Agreements are also conditional and unconditional. They are conditional when some condition must be fulfilled before they can have full effect; they are unconditional when there is no condition attached;
4. 3. Agreements are annulled or rendered of no effect, first, by the acts of the parties, as, by payment; release accord and satisfaction; rescission, which is express or implied; 1 Watts & Serg. 442; defeasance; by novation: secondly, by the acts of the law, as, confusion; merger; lapse of time; death, as when a man who has bound himself to teach an apprentice, dies; extinction of the thing which is the subject of the contract, as, when the agreement is to deliver a certain horse and before the time of delivery he dies. See Discharge of a Contract.
5. The writing or instrument containing an agreement is also called an agreement, and sometimes articles of agreement.(q. V.)
6. It is proper, to remark that there is much difference between an agreement and articles of agreement which are only evidence of it. From the moment that the parties have given their consent, the agreement or contract is formed, and, whether it can be proved or not, it has not less the quality to bind both contracting parties. A want of proof does not make it null, because that proof may be supplied aliunde, and the moment it is obtained, the contract may be enforced.
7. Again, the agreement may be null, as when it was obtained by fraud, duress, and the like; and the articles of agreement may be good, as far as the form is concerned. Vide Contract. Deed; Guaranty; Parties to Contracts.


With any:

a) “Unbelievers”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #571 apistos {ap'-is-tos} meaning unfaithful, faithless, (not to be trusted, perfidious) unbelieving, incredulous, without trust (in God).

From Webster’s 1828: An incredulous person; one who does not believe; an infidel; one who discredits revelation, or the mission, character and doctrines of Christ.


b) “Unrighteous”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #458 anomia {an-om-ee'-ah} meaning the condition of without law because ignorant of it and/or because of violating it; contempt and violation of law, iniquity, wickedness.

From Webster’s 1828: not righteous; not just; not conformed in heart and life to the divine law; evil, wicked; used of persons; contrary to law and equity;


c) “Darkness”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #4655 skotos {skot'-os} meaning, metaphorically, of ignorance respecting divine things and human duties, and the accompanying ungodliness and immorality, together with their consequent misery in hell; persons in whom darkness becomes visible and holds sway.

From Webster’s 1828: 1. Absence of light; 2. Obscurity; want of clearness or perspicuity; that quality or state which renders any thing difficult to be understood; 3. A state of being intellectually clouded; ignorance; 7. Empire of Satan

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary: …a symbol of the judgments that attend on the coming of the Lord. It is a symbol of misery and adversity. "Works of darkness" are impure actions. It is also a symbol of ignorance and of death.

From Smith’s Dictionary of the Bible: Opposite of light, absence of light; used as a figure of adversity and misery.


d) “Belial”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #955 Belial {bel-ee'-al} or Beliar {bel-ee'-ar} meaning worthless or wicked; a name of Satan

From Webster’s 1828: unprofitableness; wickedness; worthless; In a collective sense, wicked men.

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary: worthlessness, frequently used in the Old Testament as a proper name. In the New Testament it is found only in 2 Cor. 6:15, where it is used as a name of Satan, the personification of all that is evil.

From Smith’s Dictionary of the Bible: The translators of our A.V., following the Vulgate, have frequently treated this word as a proper name, and given it in the form Belial, in accordance with 2 Cor. vi. 15. There can be no question, however, that the word is not to be regarded as a proper name in the O.T.; its meaning is worthlessness, and hence recklessness and lawlessness. The term as used in 2 Cor. vi. 15 is generally understood as an appellative of Satan, as the personification of all that was bad.


e) “Infidel”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #571 apistos {ap'-is-tos} meaning unfaithful, faithless, (not to be trusted, perfidious) unbelieving, incredulous, without trust (in God).

From Webster’s 1828: One who disbelieves the inspiration of the Scriptures, and the divine origin of Christianity.

From Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition: One who does not believe in the existence of a God who will reward or punish in this world or in that which is to come. One who professes no religion that can bind his conscience to speak the truth. One who does not recognize the inspiration or obligation of the Holy Scriptures, or generally recognized features of the Christian religion.

From Bouvier’s Dictionary of Law, 1856: 1. persons, evidence. One who does not believe in the existence of a God, who will reward or punish in this world or that which is to come. Willes' R. 550. This term has been very indefinitely applied. Under the name of infidel, Lord Coke comprises Jews and heathens; 2 Inst 506; 3 Inst. 165; and Hawkins includes among infidels, such as do not believe either in the Old or New Testament. Hawk. P. C. b 2, c. 46, s. 148. 2. It is now settled that when the witness believes in a God who will reward or punish him even in this world he is competent. See willes, R. 550. His belief may be proved from his previous declarations and avowed opinions; and when he has avowed himself to be an infidel, he may show a reform of his conduct, and change of his opinion since the declarations proved when the declarations have been made for a very considerable space of time, slight proof will suffice to show he has changed his opinion.


f) “Idols”

From Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, 1890: #1497 eidolon {i'-do-lon} meaning an image, likeness, i.e. whatever represents the form of an object, either real or imaginary; used of the shades of the departed, apparitions, spectres, phantoms of the mind, etc.; the image of an heathen god; a false god.

From Webster’s 1828: 1. An image, form or representation, usually of a man or other animal, consecrated as an object of worship; a pagan deity. 2. An image. 3. A person loved and honored to adoration. 4. Any thing on which we set our affections; that to which we indulge an excessive and sinful attachment. 5. A representation.
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