State

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State

Post by notmartha » Sun Aug 05, 2018 12:20 pm

STATE

BIBLE

The noun “state” as used in reference to government and/or body politic is not found in the KJV.

Anti-Thought-Control Dictionary created by American Christian Ministries
State

CONTROLLED MEANING: A parcel of land having distinct borders and a central government. One such parcel of land united with other such parcels and jointly controlled by one larger "national" (central) government. A smaller sovereign government within a sovereign national government. One section of a multi-section nation.

CORRECT MEANING: "State" is the correct name for what people usually call a "nation." From the Greek "stat" fixed; stationary. A state is a fixed, ruling government over one body of people. Thus, what is called "The United States" is actually one large superstate.

"States" exist only in the minds of men. They are mental concepts … not physical entities.

A "state" (as in "The United States") is a corporate fiction existing purely in thought. Corporations, and all similar creations, are FICTIONS (Neither natural nor existing of themselves. Mere Imagination). They exist by agreement of thought between men. Likewise, a "State" exists ONLY in people's minds. It is not real! You cannot see it. You cannot feel it. A "State" is not a piece of land. A "State" is a political creation: a mental invention of men, designed to control the people within a given area. It is not a Biblical concept.
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
4. Estate; possession. [See Estate.]

5. A political body, or body politic; the whole body of people united under one government, whatever may be the form of the government.
Municipal law is a rule of conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state
More usually the word signifies a political body governed by representatives; a commonwealth; as the States of Greece; the States of America. In this sense, state has sometimes more immediate reference to the government, sometimes to the people or community. Thus when we say, the state has made provision for the paupers, the word has reference to the government or legislature; but when we say, the state is taxed to support paupers, the word refers to the whole people or community.

6. A body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as the civil and ecclesiastical states in Great Britain. But these are sometimes distinguished by the terms church and state In this case, state signifies the civil community or government only.

7. Rank; condition; quality; as the state of honor.

8. Pomp; appearance of greatness.
In state the monarchs marchd.
Where least of state there most of love is shown.

9. Dignity; grandeur.
She instructed him how he should keep state yet with a modest sense of his misfortunes.

10. A seat of dignity.
This chair shall be my state

11. A canopy; a covering of dignity.
His high throne, under state of richest texture spread-- [Unusual.]

12. A person of high rank. [Not in use.]

13. The principal persons in a government.
The bold design pleasd highly those infernal states.

14. The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as the states general.

15. Joined with another word, it denotes public, or what belongs to the community or body politic; as state affairs; state policy.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856
STATE, government.

1. This word is used in various senses. In its most enlarged sense, it signifies a self sufficient body of persons united together in one community for the defence of their rights, and to do right and justice to foreigners. In this sense, the state means the whole people united into one body politic; (q. v.) and the state, and the people of the state, are equivalent expressions. 1 Pet. Cond. Rep. 37 to 39; 3 Dall. 93; 2 Dall. 425; 2 Wilson's Lect. 120; Dane's Appx. §50, p. 63 1 Story, Const. §361. In a more limited sense, the word `state' expresses merely the positive or actual organization of the legislative, or judicial powers; thus the actual government of the state is designated by the name of the state; hence the expression, the state has passed such a law, or prohibited such an act. State also means the section of territory occupied by a state, as the state of Pennsylvania.

2. By the word state is also meant, more particularly, one of the commonwealths which form the United States of America. The constitution of the United States makes the following provisions in relation to the states.

3. Art. 1, s. 9, §5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or re venue to the ports of one state over those of another, nor shall vessels bound to or from one state be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another.

4. §6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time.

5. §7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States, and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them shall, without the consent of congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title of any kind whatever, from, any king, prince, or foreign state.

6. Art. 1, s. 10, §1. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payments of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto, or law impairing the obligation of contracts; or grant any title of nobility.

7. §2. No state shall, without the consent of congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net produce of all duties and imposts laid by any state on imports or exports shall be for the use of the treasury of the United States, and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of congress. No state, shall, without the consent of congress, lay any duty on tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay.

8. The district of Columbia and the territorial districts of the United States, are not states within the meaning of the constitution and of the judiciary act, so as to enable a citizen thereof to sue a citizen of one of the states in the federal courts. 2 Cranch, 445; 1 Wheat. 91.

9. The several states composing the United States are sovereign and independent, in all things not surrendered to the national government by the constitution, and are considered, on general principles, by each other as foreign states, yet their mutual relations are rather those of domestic independence, than of foreign alienation. 7 Cranch, 481; 3 Wheat. 324; 1 Greenl. Ev. §489, 504. Vide, generally, Mr. Madison's report in the legislature of Virginia, January, 1800; 1 Story's Com. on Const. §208; 1 Kent, Com. 189, note b; Grotius, B. 1, c. 1, s. 14; Id. B. 3, c. 3, s. 2; Burlamaqui, vol. 2, pt. 1, c. 4, s. 9; Vattel, B. 1, c. 1; 1 Toull. n. 202, note 1 Nation; Cicer. de Repub. 1. 1, s. 25.
Cyclopaedia of Political Science, Political Economy, and of the Political History of the United States, vol. 3, John Joseph Lalor, 1881
STATE, The.

Although natural, and founded on what is most imperious in our sympathies and our wants, society is not maintained and preserved without an effort. The bond which holds it together would be weak indeed and forever in jeopardy if a protective power were not established superior to individual wills to keep them within bounds and to defend the persons and the rights of each against the attacks of violence. Men may wish to see the authority here referred to invested with this form or that; they may attribute to it this or that historical origin: but all agree that it is indispensable to the maintenance of human society, and that only perfectly wise or perfectly brute creatures can do without government.

—But it is clear that there is a great difference between the purely repressive authority with which the elders of a tribe are invested, and the complicated and powerful organism called the state in nations advanced in civilization. When society has reached a certain degree of development; when the cultivation of land possessed in common or appropriated by individuals requires security; when foresight inspired by offensive or defensive war has engendered the habit in a people of making certain preparations in common in view of common danger and enterprises in common; and when certain ideas, beliefs and feelings, held by all the members of a given society, have given birth to the moral unity of the nation, the nation is necessarily developed, and assumes a character of solidity, duration and permanence. It extends its sphere of action, and is completed by the addition and regular working of numerous wheels, each having a distinct existence, and all functioning in harmony. The living personification of the fatherland, the instrument of its strength at home and abroad, the author and enforcer of the law, the supreme arbiter of interests, judge of peace and war, the protector of the weak, the representative of all that is general in the wants of society, the organ of the common reason and of the collective force of society: such is the state in all its power and majesty. Superior to all it governs, the state nevertheless owes to its own citizens all that it is. But it is absolutely necessary that we should remark: what society has confided to the guardianship of the state as a precious deposit depends no more upon society than it does upon the state—the sacred deposit of justice. (See JUSTICE.) Justice does not emanate from the individuals who compose society; it imposes itself on them as their rule of action. In vain do certain publicists maintain that the state can do everything because it is above everything. Nothing is more destitute of foundation than such an assertion. Its rights would be limited by its duties even if they were not limited by positive guarantees written in the laws. The state, too, has a rule and bridle in justice. The law emanates from the state. But the power to make the law and to employ force in its service, does not imply that the state has the unlimited power to make what is unjust just, or the just unjust, at its pleasure. Human beings are subject to moral laws, against which the state has no more power than it has against the physical laws which govern matter.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 1st Edition, 1891
STATE,

A body politic, or society of men, united together for the purpose of promoting their mutual safety and advantage, by the joint efforts of their combined strength. Cooley, Const. Lim. 1.

One of the component commonwealths or states of the United States of America.

The people of a state, in their collective capacity, considered as the party wronged by a criminal deed; the public; as in the title of a cause, “The State vs. A. B.”

The section of territory occupied by one of the United States.
The Century Dictionary, an Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, 1895
State

11. The whole people of one body politic; the commonwealth: usually with the definite article; in a particular sense, a civil and selfgoverning community; a commonwealth.

12. The power wielded by the government of a country; the civil power, often as contrasted with the ecclesiastical ; as, the union of church and state.

13. One of the commonwealths or bodies politic which together make up a federal republic, which stand in certain specified relations with the central or national government, and as regards internal affairs are more or less independent.

Black’s Law Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1910
STATE,

A body politic, or society of men, united together for the purpose of promoting their mutual safety and advantage, by the joint efforts of their combined strength. Cooley, Const. Llm. 1.

One of the component commonwealths or states of the United States of America.

The people of a state, in their collective capacity, considered as the party wronged by a criminal deed; the public; as in the title of a cause, "The State vs. A. B."

The section of territory occupied by one of the United States.
The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English, 1919
State

organized political community with government recognized by the people, commonwealth, nation ;


Ballentine’s Law Dictionary, James A. Ballentine, Third Edition, 1969
state.

A body politic or society of men united together for the purpose of promoting their mutual safety and advantage by their combined strength, occupying a definite territory, and politically organized under one government. McLaughlin v Poucher. 127 Corni 441. 17 A2d 767. People, territory and government considered in combination. Texas v White (US) 7 Wall 700. 19 L Ed 227. ovrld on other grounds 113 Us 476. 28 L Ed 1044. 5 S Ct 588. A complete body of free persons united together for their common benefit, to enjoy peaceably what is their own, and to do justice to others. Chisholm v Georgia (US) 2 Dall 419. 1 LEd440.

Under the United States Constitution:-a political community of free citizens, occupying a territory of defined boundaries, and organized under a government sanction and limited by a written constitution, and established by the consent of the governed. Coyle v Smith. 221 Us 559. 55 L Ed 853. 31 S Ct 688. For the purposes of the Fair Labor Standards Act. any state of the United States, the District of Columbia. or any territory or possession of the United States. 29 USC § 203(c).
Black’s Law Dictionary, 4th Edition, 1968
STATE, n.

A people permanently occupying a fixed territory bound together by common-law habits and custom into one body politic exercising, through the medium of an organized government, independent sovereignty and control over all persons and things within its boundaries, capable of making war and peace and of entering into international relations with other communities of the globe. United States v. Kusche, D.C.Cal., 56 F. Supp. 201, 207, 208. The organization of social life which exercises sovereign power in behalf of the people. Delany v. Moraitis, .C.A.Md., 136 F. 2d 129, 130.

One of the component commonwealths or States of the United States of America. The term is sometimes applied also to governmental agencies authorized by state, such as municipal corporations. George v. City of Portland, 114 Or. 418, 235 P. 681, 683, 39 A.L.R. 341.

The people of a state, in their collective capacity, considered as the party wronged by a criminal deed; the public; as in the title of a cause, "The State vs. A. B."

The section of territory occupied by one of the United States.

The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at a given time. State v. Inich, 55 Mont. 1,
173 P. 230, 234.
Foreign State

A foreign country or nation. The several United States are considered "foreign" to each other except as regards their relations as common members of the Union.
Black’s Law Dictionary, 5th Edition, 1979
State, n.

A people permanently occupying a fixed territory bound together by common-law habits and custom into one body politic exercising, through the medium of an organized government, independent sovereignty and control over all persons and things within its boundaries, capable of making war and peace and of entering into international relations with other communities of the globe. United States v. Kusche, D.C.Cal., 56 F.Supp. 20 1 , 207, 208. The organization of social life which exercises sovereign power in behalf of the people. Delany v. Moraitis, C.C.A.Md., 136 F.2d 129, 130. In its largest sense, a "state" is a body politic or a society of men. Beagle v. Motor Vehicle Acc. Indemnification Corp., 44 Misc.2d 636, 254 N.Y.S.2d 763, 765. A body of people occupying a definite territory and politically organized under one government. State ex reI. Maisano v. Mitchell, 155 Conn. 256, 23 1 A.2d 539, 542. A territorial unit with a distinct general body of law. Restatement, Second, Conflicts, § 3. Term may refer either to body politic of a nation (e.g. United States) or to an individual governmental unit of such nation (e.g. California).

The section of territory occupied by one of the United States. One of the component commonwealths or states of the United States of America. The term is sometimes applied also to governmental agencies authorized by state, such as municipal corporations. Any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and any territory or possession subject to the legislative authority of the United States. Uniform Probate Code, § 1-201 (40).

The people of a state, in their collective capacity, considered as the party wronged by a criminal deed; the public; as in the title of a cause, "The State vs. A. B."

Term "state" as used in rules providing when a state may appeal in a criminal case is all inclusive and intended to include not only the state but its political subdivisions, counties and cities. Spokane County v. Gifford, 9 Wash.App. 54 1 , 5 13 P.2d 301 , 302. Federal Government i s a "state" bound by all of provisions of the Interstate Agreement on Detainers. Enright v. U. S., D.C.N.Y., 437 F.Supp. 580, 581 .

The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at a given time.
MISCELLANEOUS CITATIONS

20 U.S. Code § 9548 - State defined
In this part, the term “State” means each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
34 U.S. Code § 40312 – Definitions
(6) State
The term “State” means any State, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
42 U.S. Code § 15065 – Definition
In this part, the term “State” means each of the several States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, and Guam.
46 U.S. Code § 112 – State
In this title, the term “State” means a State of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, and any other territory or possession of the United States.
US Code 50 §1801
State - any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and any territory or possession of the United States.
US Code 50 §3161
State - any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and any possession of the United States.
US Code 50 § 1885
State - any State, political subdivision of a State, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, and any territory or possession of the United States, and includes any officer, public utility commission, or other body authorized to regulate an electronic communication service provider.
Code 50 §1701
State - each of the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.
DHS/FEMA, NRF, Glossary
state - When capitalized, refers to any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and any possession of the United States.
7 CFR § 1205.22 State.
The term State means each of the 50 states.
7 CFR § 1230.24 State.
State means each of the 50 States.
7 CFR 1260.107 - State.
State means each of the 50 States.
QUOTATIONS

Albert Jay Nock
Many now believe that with the rise of the totalitarian State the world has entered upon a new era of barbarism. It has not. The totalitarian State is only the State; the kind of thing it does is only what the State has always done with unfailing regularity, if it had the power to do it, wherever and whenever its own aggrandizement made that kind of thing expedient. Give any State like power hereafter, and put it in like circumstances, and it will do precisely the same kind of thing. The State will unfailingly aggrandize itself, if only it has the power, first at the expense of its own citizens, and then at the expense of anyone else in sight. It has always done so, and always will.
[T]he State's criminality is nothing new and nothing to be wondered at. It began when the first predatory group of men clustered together and formed the State, and it will continue as long as the State exists in the world, because the State is fundamentally an anti-social institution, fundamentally criminal. The idea that the State originated to serve any kind of social purpose is completely unhistorical. It originated in conquest and confiscation -- that is to say, in crime. It originated for the purpose of maintaining the division of society into an owning-and-exploiting class and a propertyless dependent class -- that is, for a criminal purpose. No State known to history originated in any other manner, or for any other purpose. Like all predatory or parasitic institutions, its first instinct is that of self-preservation. All its enterprises are directed first towards preserving its own life, and, second, towards increasing its own power and enlarging the scope of its own activity. For the sake of this it will, and regularly does, commit any crime which circumstances make expedient.
It is interesting to observe that in the year 1935 the average individual's incurious attitude towards the phenomenon of the State is precisely what his attitude was toward the phenomenon of the Church in the year, say, 1500. ... it does not appear to have occurred to the Church-citizen of that day, any more than it occurs to the State-citizen of the present, to ask what sort of institution it was that claimed his allegiance.
The State, both in its genesis and by its primary intention, is purely anti-social. It is not based on the idea of natural rights, but on the idea that the individual has no rights except those that the State may provisionally grant him. It has always made justice costly and difficult of access, and has invariably held itself above justice and common morality whenever it could advantage itself by so doing.
Here is the Golden Rule of sound citizenship, the first and greatest lesson in the study of politics: You get the same order of criminality from any State to which you give power to exercise it; and whatever power you give the State to do things FOR you carries with it the equivalent power to do things TO you.
It can not even be said that the State has ever shown any disposition to suppress crime, but only to safeguard its own monopoly of crime.
Thomas Jefferson:
The several states composing the United States of America are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government; but by a compact under the style and title of a Constitution for the United States, and of amendments thereto, they constituted a general government for special purposes [and] delegated to that government certain definite powers and whensoever the general government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force. To this compact each state acceded as a state, and is an integral party, its co-states forming, as to itself, the other party. The government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself, since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution the measure of its powers.
I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground that 'all powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are preserved to the states or to the people.' ... To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress is to take possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible of any definition. The incorporation of a bank, and the powers assumed by this bill (chartering the first Bank of the United States), have not, been delegated to the United States by the Constitution.
For the power given to Congress by the Constitution does not extend to the internal regulation of the commerce of a State (that is to say, of the commerce between citizen and citizen,) which remain exclusively with its own legislature; but to its external commerce only, that is to say, its commerce with another State, or with foreign nations, or with the Indian tribes.
Friedrich Nietzsche:
The state is the coldest of all cold monsters. Coldly it lies, too; and this lie creeps from its mouth: `I, the state, am the people.'... Everything about it is false; it bites with stolen teeth.
Everything the State says is a lie, and everything it has it has stolen.
The governments of the great States have two instruments for keeping the people dependent, in fear and obedience: a coarser, the army; and a more refined, the school.
Benito Mussolini:
Against individualism, the fascist conception is for the State; and it is for the individual in so far as he coincides with the State, which is the conscience and universal will of man...
The corporate State considers that private enterprise in the sphere of production is the most effective and useful instrument in the interest of the nation. In view of the fact that private organisation of production is a function of national concern, the organiser of the enterprise is responsible to the State for the direction given to production.
Fascism conceives of the State as an absolute, in comparison with which all individuals or groups are relative, only to be conceived in their relation to the State.
The Fascist State lays claim to rule in the economic field no less than in others; it makes its action felt throughout the length and breadth of the country by means of its corporate, social, and educational institutions, and all the political, economic, and spiritual forces of the nation, organised in their respective associations, circulate within the State.
The Fascist conception of the State is all-embracing; outside of it no human or spiritual values can exist, much less have value. Thus understood, Fascism is totalitarian, and the Fascist State -- a synthesis and a unit inclusive of all values -- interprets, develops, and potentiates the whole life of a people.
Frédéric Bastiat:
Socialism, like the ancient ideas from which it springs, confuses the distinction between government and society. As a result of this, every time we object to a thing being done by government, the socialists conclude that we object to its being done at all. We disapprove of state education. Then the socialists say that we are opposed to any education. We object to a state religion. Then the socialists say that we want no religion at all. We object to a state-enforced equality. Then they say that we are against equality. And so on, and so on. It is as if the socialists were to accuse us of not wanting persons to eat because we do not want the state to raise grain.
The state tends to expand in proportion to its means of existence and to live beyond its means, and these are, in the last analysis, nothing but the substance of the people. Woe to the people that cannot limit the sphere of action of the state! Freedom, private enterprise, wealth, happiness, independence, personal dignity, all vanish.
Everyone wants to live at the expense of the state. They forget that the state lives at the expense of everyone.
The state is the great fiction by which everybody seeks to live at the expense of everybody else.
Aldous Huxley:
A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude. To make them love it is the task assigned, in present-day totalitarian states, to ministries of propaganda, newspaper editors and schoolteachers.... The greatest triumphs of propaganda have been accomplished, not by doing something, but by refraining from doing. Great is truth, but still greater, from a practical point of view, is silence about truth.
Henry David Thoreau:
Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government? Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man? There will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly. I please myself with imagining a State at least which can afford to be just to all men, and to treat the individual with respect as a neighbor; which even would not think it inconsistent with its own repose if a few were to live aloof from it, not meddling with it, nor embraced by it, who fulfilled all the duties of neighbors and fellow-men. A State which bore this kind of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast as it ripened, would prepare the way for a still more perfect and glorious State, which also I have imagined, but not yet anywhere seen.
Others -- as most legislators, politicians, lawyers, ministers, and office-holders -- serve the state chiefly with their heads; and, as they rarely make any moral distinctions, they are as likely to serve the devil, without intending it, as God. A very few -- as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men -- serve the state with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part ...
Adolf Hitler:
The state must declare the child to be the most precious treasure of the people. ... Here the state must act as the guardian of a millennial future in the face of which the wishes and the selfishness of the individual must appear as nothing and submit.
Margaret Thatcher:
We want a society in which we are free to make choices, to make mistakes, to be generous and compassionate. That is what we mean by a moral society – not a society in which the State is responsible for everything, and no one is responsible for the State.
Murray N. Rothbard:
Since the State necessarily lives by the compulsory confiscation of private capital, and since its expansion necessarily involves ever-greater incursions on private individuals and private enterprise, we must assert that the state is profoundly and inherently anti-capitalist.
Mahatma Mohandas K. Gandhi:
The state represents violence in a concentrated and organized form. The individual has a soul, but as the state is a soulless machine, it can never be weaned from violence to which it owes its very existence.
Richard Mitchell:
We should...be able to see that our interest would be best served not by asking the state to promulgate our values but by forbidding the state to promulgate any values at all. If the state can espouse some value that we love, it can, with equal justice, espouse others we do not love.
Jeffrey R. Snyder:
To own firearms is to affirm that freedom and liberty are not gifts from the state. It is to reserve final judgment about whether the state is encroaching on freedom and liberty, to stand ready to defend that freedom with more than mere words, and to stand outside the state’s totalitarian reach.
Jacob G. Hornberger:
The cult of the omnipotent state has millions of followers in the united States. Americans of today view their government in the same way as Christians view their God; they worship and adore the state and they render their lives and fortunes to it. Statists believe that their lives -- their very being -- are a privilege that the state has given to them. They believe that everything they do is -- and should be -- dependent on the consent of the government. Thus, statists support such devices as income taxation, licensing laws, regulations, passports, trade restrictions, and the like.
John C. Calhoun:
It is federal, because it is the government of States united in a political union, in contradistinction to a government of individuals, that is, by what is usually called, a social compact. To express it more concisely, it is federal and not national because it is the government of a community of States, and not the government of a single State or Nation.
Vladimir Ilyich Lenin:
While the State exists, there can be no freedom. When there is freedom there will be no State.
Patrick Henry:
I have the highest veneration of those Gentleman, -- but, Sir, give me leave to demand, what right had they to say, We, the People? My political curiosity, exclusive of my anxious solicitude for the public welfare, leads me to ask who authorized them to speak the language of, We, the People, instead of We, the States? States are the characteristics, and the soul of the confederation. If the States be not the agents of this compact, it must be one of great consolidated National Government of the people of all the States.
H. L. Mencken:
It [the State] has taken on a vast mass of new duties and responsibilities; it has spread out its powers until they penetrate to every act of the citizen, however secret; it has begun to throw around its operations the high dignity and impeccability of a State religion; its agents become a separate and superior caste, with authority to bind and loose, and their thumbs in every pot. But it still remains, as it was in the beginning, the common enemy of all well-disposed, industrious and decent men.
Thomas Paine:
Some writers have so confounded society with government, as to leave little or no distinction between them; whereas they are not only different, but have different origins. Society is produced by our wants, and government by wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher. Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one ...
Ludwig von Mises:
Violent resistance against the power of the state is the last resort of the minority in its effort to break loose from the oppression of the majority. ... The citizen must not be so narrowly circumscribed in his activities that, if he thinks differently from those in power, his only choice is either to perish or to destroy the machinery of state.
Max Stirner:
The state calls its own violence law, but that of the individual crime.


Vladimir Ilyich Lenin:
The aim of socialism is not only to abolish the present division of mankind into small states and all-national isolation, not only to bring the nations closer to each other, but also to merge them.
Joseph Paul Goebbels:
It is the absolute right of the state to supervise the formation of public opinion.
Albert Einstein:
Never do anything against conscience even if the state demands it.

See also STATISM, NATION, DEEP STATE
Teach me thy way, O LORD, and lead me in a plain path, because of mine enemies. Psalm 27:11
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notmartha
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this State vs. the State

Post by notmartha » Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:33 pm

People are often confused by the difference between "this State" and "the State" (or "this Commonwealth" and "the Commonwealth") as found in codes and statutes. The following is provided in hopes of improving understanding:

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
THE, an adjective or definitive adjective.

1. This adjective is used as a definitive, that is, before nouns which are specific or understood; or it is used to limit their signification to a specific thing or things, or to describe them; as the laws of the twelve tables. the independent tribunals of justice in our country, are the security or private rights, and the best bulwark against arbitrary power. the sun is the source of light and heat.
This he calls the preaching of the cross.

2. the is also used rhetorically before a noun in the singular number, to denote a species by way of distinction; a single thing representing the whole. the fig tree putteth forth her green figs; the almond tree shall flourish; the grasshopper shall be a burden.

3. In poetry, the sometimes loses the final vowel before another vowel.
Th' adorning thee with so much art,
Is but a barb'rous skill.

4. the is used before adjectives in the comparative and superlative degree. the longer we continue in sin, the more difficult it is to reform. the most strenuous exertions will be used to emancipate Greece. the most we can do is to submit; the best we can do; the worst that can happen.
THIS, definitive adjective or substitute. plural these.

1. this is a definitive, or definitive adjective, denoting something that is present or near in place or time, or something just mentioned. Is this your younger brother? What trespass is this which ye have committed?
Who did sin, this man or his parents, that he was born blind? John 9:2.
When they heard this they were pricked to the heart. Acts 2:6.
In the latter passage, this is a substitute for what had preceded, vix. the discourse of Peter just delivered. In like manner, this often represents a word, a sentence or clause, or a series of sentences of events.
In some cases, it refers to what is future, or to be immediately related.
But know this that if the good man of the house had known in what watch the thief would come, he would have watched, and would not have suffered his house to be broken up. Matthew 24:14.
Here this refers to the whole subsequent member of the sentence.

2. By this is used elliptically for by this time; as, by this the mail has arrived.

3. this is used with words denoting time past; as, I have taken no snuff for this month; and often with plural words. I have not wept this forty years.
In this case, this in the singular, refers to the whole term of time, or period; this period of forty years.

4. this is opposed to that.
THIS way and that the wav'ring sails they bend.
A body of this or that denomination is produced.
THIS and that, in this use, denote difference indefinitely.

5. When this and that refer to different things before expressed, this refers to the thing last mentioned, and that to the thing first mentioned. [See These.]
Their judgment in this we may not, and in that we need not, follow.

6. It is sometimes opposed to other.
Consider the arguments which the author had to write this or to design the other, before you arraign him.


PENNSYLVANIA CODE & BULLETIN STYLE MANUAL FIFTH EDITION 2014
http://www.pacode.com/secure/StyleManual_5thEdition.pdf
this commonwealth.JPG
this commonwealth.JPG (83.22 KiB) Viewed 412 times
Interesting reading:
https://adask.wordpress.com/2014/11/10/ ... more-23199
Teach me thy way, O LORD, and lead me in a plain path, because of mine enemies. Psalm 27:11
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