Symbol Speak

Comprehending laws and contracts is impossible, unless we first learn the meaning of the words and phrases they contain.

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notmartha
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Symbol Speak

Post by notmartha » Wed Mar 20, 2019 12:46 pm

Symbols are often used by secret societies for members to speak to each other. I'm starting this thread to post about some of these symbols (and refer to symbols mentioned elsewhere on this forum.)

Many, many symbols are explored in THIS THREAD and THIS THREAD and elsewhere including:

Bees

Mithras Cap

Crocodile

Fasces
Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. 2 Tim 2:15
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notmartha
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Symbol Speak - Owl

Post by notmartha » Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:03 pm

BIBLE

Yaʿanâ, Hebrew Strong's #3284, is a noun found in the OT 8 times, translated as “owl” in the following verses:
Leviticus 11:16 - And the owl, and the night hawk, and the cuckow, and the hawk after his kind,
Deuteronomy 14:15 - And the owl, and the night hawk, and the cuckow, and the hawk after his kind,
Job 30:29 - I am a brother to dragons, and a companion to owls.
Isaiah 13:21 - But wild beasts of the desert shall lie there; and their houses shall be full of doleful creatures; and owls shall dwell there, and satyrs shall dance there.
Isaiah 34:13 - And thorns shall come up in her palaces, nettles and brambles in the fortresses thereof: and it shall be an habitation of dragons, and a court for owls.
Isaiah 43:20 - The beast of the field shall honour me, the dragons and the owls: because I give waters in the wilderness, and rivers in the desert, to give drink to my people, my chosen.
Jeremiah 50:39 - Therefore the wild beasts of the desert with the wild beasts of the islands shall dwell there, and the owls shall dwell therein: and it shall be no more inhabited for ever; neither shall it be dwelt in from generation to generation.
Micah 1:8 - Therefore I will wail and howl, I will go stripped and naked: I will make a wailing like the dragons, and mourning as the owls.
Kôs, Hebrew Strong's #3563, is a noun found 34 times in the OT translated as “cup” (31) and “owl” (3) in the following verses:
Leviticus 11:17 - And the little owl 3563, and the cormorant, and the great owl 3244,
Deuteronomy 14:16 - The little owl, and the great owl, and the swan,
Psalm 102:6 - I am like a pelican of the wilderness: I am like an owl of the desert.
Yanshûp, Hebrew Strong's #3244, is a noun found 3 times in the OT, translated as “great owl” (2) and “owl” (1).
Leviticus 11:17 - And the little owl 3563, and the cormorant, and the great owl 3244,
Deuteronomy 14:16 - The little owl, and the great owl, and the swan,
Isaiah 34:11 - But the cormorant and the bittern shall possess it; the owl also and the raven shall dwell in it: and he shall stretch out upon it the line of confusion, and the stones of emptiness.
Lîlît, Hebrew Strong's #3917, is a noun found 1 time in the OT, translated as “screech owl” in the following verse:
Isaiah 34:14 - The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the island, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest.
Qippôz, Hebrew Strong's #7091, is a noun found 1 time in the OT, translated as “great owl” in the following verse:
Isaiah 34:15 - There shall the great owl make her nest, and lay, and hatch, and gather under her shadow: there shall the vultures also be gathered, every one with her mate.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary, William Smith, 1884
OWL

A number of species of the owl are mentioned in the Bible, Levit 11:17; Deut 14:16 Isai 14:23; 34:15; Zeph 2:14 and in several other places the same Hebrew word is used where it is translated ostrich. Job 30:29; Jere 50:39 Some of these species were common in Palestine, and, as is well known, were often found inhabiting ruins. Isai 34:11, 13-15
Easton's Bible Dictionary, Matthew George Easton, 1897
Owl
(1.) Heb. bath-haya'anah, "daughter of greediness" or of "shouting." In the list of unclean birds (Lev 11:16; Deut 14:15); also mentioned in Job 30:29; Isa 13:21; Isa 34:13; Isa 43:20; Jer 50:39; Mic 1:8. In all these passages the Revised Version translates "ostrich" (q.v.), which is the correct rendering.
(2.) Heb. yanshuph, rendered "great owl" in Lev 11:17; Deut 14:16, and "owl" in Isa 34:11. This is supposed to be the Egyptian eagle-owl (Bubo ascalaphus), which takes the place of the eagle-owl (Bubo maximus) found in Southern Europe. It is found frequenting the ruins of Egypt and also of the Holy Land. "Its cry is a loud, prolonged, and very powerful hoot. I know nothing which more vividly brought to my mind the sense of desolation and loneliness than the re-echoing hoot of two or three of these great owls as I stood at midnight among the ruined temples of Baalbek" (Tristram).
(3.) Heb. kos, rendered "little owl" in Lev 11:17; Deut 14:16, and "owl" in Ps 102:6. The Arabs call this bird "the mother of ruins." It is by far the most common of all the owls of Palestine. It is the Athene persica, the bird of Minerva, the symbol of ancient Athens.
(4.) Heb. kippoz, the "great owl" (Isa 34:15); Revised Version, "arrow-snake;" LXX. and Vulgate, "hedgehog," reading in the text, kippod, instead of kippoz. There is no reason to doubt the correctness of the rendering of the Authorized Version. Tristram says: "The word (i.e., kippoz) is very possibly an imitation of the cry of the scops owl (Scops giu), which is very common among ruins, caves, and old walls of towns...It is a migrant, returning to Palestine in spring."
(5.) Heb. lilith, "screech owl" ((Isa 34:14), marg. and R.V., "night monster"). The Hebrew word is from a root signifying "night." Some species of the owl is obviously intended by this word. It may be the hooting or tawny owl (Syrnium aluco), which is common in Egypt and in many parts of Palestine. This verse in Isaiah is "descriptive of utter and perpetual desolation, of a land that should be full of ruins, and inhabited by the animals that usually make such ruins their abode."
DEFINITIONS

Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language, 1828
OWL, noun [Latin ulula, ululo.]
A fowl of the genus Strix, that flies chiefly in the night.
The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English, 1919
owl (owl), n.

Kinds of large-headed smallfaced hook-beaked large-eyed soft-plumaged nocturnal bird of prey (esp. Barn O., Tawny O., & Long-eared or Homed O., each with other names, as Church, Screech, Hooting, &c, O. ; solemn person, wise-looking dullard,
MISCELLANEOUS

The Secret Teachings Of All Ages, Manly P. Hall, 1928
Since the world began, living things have feared the darkness; those few creatures who use it as a shield for their maneuvers were usually connected with the Spirit of Evil. Consequently cats, bats, toads, and owls are associated with witchcraft.
Nocturnal birds were appropriate symbols of both sorcery and the secret divine sciences: sorcery because black magic cannot function in the light of truth (day) and is powerful only when surrounded by ignorance (night); and the divine sciences because those possessing the arcana are able to see through the darkness of ignorance and materiality. Owls and bats were consequently often associated with either witchcraft or wisdom.
SYMBOLS OUT AND ABOUT

On the grounds of the DuPont mansion - a great owl and skull & bones design
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Roman Goddess Minerva with an owl on Confederate Bank Note
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Owl on the dollar bill

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Bohemian Grove's mascot - 30-foot (9 m) hollow owl statue made of concrete over steel supports. Since 1929, the Owl Shrine has served as the backdrop of the yearly Cremation of Care ceremony.

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Athenian Owl at the Acropolis:

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Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. 2 Tim 2:15
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