Minimum wage

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Minimum wage

Post by editor » Wed Oct 22, 2014 6:11 pm

Editor's note: I thought I'd already started this topic. If I did, I can't find it. This is such an important issue for people to get their minds around, I just have to start addressing it.
The original link for this article is here: http://www.creators.com/conservative/wa ... mists.html
Embarrassing Economists
by Walter E. Williams

So as to give some perspective, I'm going to ask readers for their guesses about human behavior before explaining my embarrassment by some of my fellow economists.

Suppose the prices of ladies jewelry rose by 100 percent. What would you predict would happen to sales? What about a 25 or 50 percent price increase? I'm going to guess that the average person would predict that sales would fall.

Would you make the same prediction about auto sales if cars' prices rose by 100 percent or 25 or 50 percent? Suppose that you're the CEO of General Motors and your sales manager tells you the company could increase auto sales by advertising a 100 percent or 50 percent price increase. I'm guessing that you'd fire the sales manager for both lunacy and incompetency.

Let's try one more. What would you predict would happen to housing sales if prices rose by 50 percent? I'm guessing you'd predict a decline in sales. You say, "OK, Williams, you're really trying our patience with these obvious questions. What's your point?"

It turns out that there's a law in economics known as the first fundamental law of demand, to which there are no known real-world exceptions. The law states that the higher the price of something the less people will take of it and vice versa. Another way of stating this very simple law is: There exists a price whereby people can be induced to take more of something, and there exists a price whereby people will take less of something.

Some people suggest that if the price of something is raised, buyers will take more or the same amount. That's silly because there'd be no limit to the price that sellers would charge. For example, if a grocer knew he would sell more — or the same amount of — milk at $8 a gallon than at $4 a gallon, why in the world would he sell it at $4? Then the question becomes: Why would he sell it at $8 if people would buy the same amount at a higher price?

There are economists, most notably Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, who suggest that the law of demand applies to everything except labor prices (wages) of low-skilled workers.
Krugman says that paying fast-food workers $15 an hour wouldn't cause big companies such as McDonald's to cut jobs. In other words, Krugman argues that raising the minimum wage doesn't change employer behavior.

Before we address Krugman's fallacious argument, think about this: One of Galileo's laws says the influence of gravity on a falling body in a vacuum is to cause it to accelerate at a rate of 32 feet per second per second. That applies to a falling rock, steel ball or feather. What would you think of the reasoning capacity of a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who'd argue that because human beings are not rocks, steel balls or feathers, Galileo's law of falling bodies doesn't apply to them?

Krugman says that most minimum-wage workers are employed in what he calls non-tradable industries — industries that can't move to China. He says that there are few mechanization opportunities where minimum-wage workers are employed — for example, fast-food restaurants, hotels, etc. That being the case, he contends, seeing as there aren't good substitutes for minimum-wage workers, they won't suffer unemployment from increases in the minimum wage. In other words, the law of demand doesn't apply to them.

Let's look at some of the history of some of Krugman's non-tradable industries. During the 1940s and '50s, there were very few self-serve gasoline stations. There were also theater ushers to show patrons to their seats. In 1900, 41 percent of the U.S. labor force was employed in agriculture. Now most gas stations are self-serve. Theater ushers disappeared. And only 2 percent of today's labor force works in agricultural jobs. There are many other examples of buyers of labor services seeking and ultimately finding substitutes when labor prices rise. It's economic malpractice for economists to suggest that they don't.
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.
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How Minimum Wage Laws Promote Racial Discrimination

Post by editor » Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:46 pm

[Editor's note: This article first appeared at this link: http://www.garynorth.com/public/12683.cfm

How Minimum Wage Laws Promote Racial Discrimination
Gary North - July 18, 2014

It was over 40 years ago that I first heard Walter Williams speak at a conference. Anyway, I think it was over 40 years ago. It could not have been less.

He and I were on what speakers call the rubber-chicken circuit as early as 1974. We spoke to high school teachers in a program sponsored by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, "The Role of Business in Society," or ROBIS. As I recall, I had heard him speak before we were on the summer lecture circuit.

I remember very clearly his main point at one of his lectures. He said that minimum-wage legislation discriminates against teenage black males. This has been known by economists since at least the mid-1950's. The statistical evidence on this was overwhelming. But high school teachers had not heard this.

What made Williams' speech memorable was the fact that he clarified the reason why the minimum-wage legislation was detrimental to teenage black males. He made the observation, which nobody challenged: the teenage black males are considered undesirables by the general population. In other words, they are discriminated against. They suffer from the stereotypes attached to their particular group.

He asked the obvious question: "How does someone who is part of a group that is discriminated against find a way to prove to somebody doing the discriminating that his assessment is incorrect?" It was really this question: "How do undesirables break through the discrimination against them?"

He made what was considered an obvious point from the point of view of an economist, but which was not obvious to his audience. He said that the person who is discriminated against needs to have a competitive edge that will enable him to compete effectively with members of groups that are not discriminated against. The free market offers such a tool, he said: wage competition. Specifically in the case of competition among potential workers who want to be employed, the most effective competitive edge available is the offer to work for less money per hour. This offer is taken seriously by employers.

Minimum-wage legislation makes it illegal for employers to take advantage of such offers. This removes the most effective single competitive strategy that is available to a person who is considered undesirable because of his membership in a particular group that is widely considered undesirable. This economic analysis applies to all sorts of groups.

Statistically, economists in 1974 knew that unemployment rates for black teenage males began to exceed the unemployment rate for white teenage males when the system of minimum-wage legislation was first enacted by the federal government. The statistics on this go back as far as the legislation (http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/t ... m-wage-law).

By focusing on individual offers made by members of undesirable groups to potential employers, Williams focused on microeconomics. He focused on decisions at the margin. This is where economic decisions are made: at the margin.

By making an offer to work for less than members of desirable groups are willing to work for, members of undesirable groups gain an edge in the marketplace. As soon as an employer is made aware of such an offer, he now faces a cost for any future discrimination. If he refuses to take the offer, he is going to have to pay a higher wage to a member of a desirable group. This is going to increase his cost of doing business. In other words, he suffers an economic loss. "Cost" is defined as "that which you have to give up in order to gain what you want." The employer wants low-cost workers. He wants to pocket the difference between the price he pays for their output and the money he receives from consumers of their output. It is "buy low, sell high." If an employer refuses to hire someone who has made an offer to work for less, this increases his cost of doing business. From an economic standpoint, this imposes the cost of discrimination on the employer.

Williams understood that some employers, meaning employers at the margin, want to gain a competitive edge against other employers. They will therefore be willing to accept offers from certain individuals who are willing to work at wages that are lower than average in the industry. By making the offer, the member of an undesirable group imposes the cost of discrimination on anybody who will not accept his offer.

There is no question about the origin of minimum-wage legislation. It came from trade unions. Trade unions did not want to face competition from workers who were not members of a union. They wanted to make it illegal for businessman to take advantage of offers to work for less than what the trade union members were able to extract from employers, based on their monopolistic position in the industry. The federal government, through the Wagner Act of 1933, had made it illegal for businesses to offer low-wage jobs, if half of the employees, plus one, voted to unionize the business.

What was happening, union leaders understood, was that blacks were in a position to break the stranglehold of the unions in some industries, because they could go to employers and use their competitive edge: a willingness to work for less money per hour. The way to stop this, the union leaders understood, was to make it illegal for any employer to hire anyone at a wage below the mandated minimum wage. This would stop competition against trade unions.

From a political standpoint, it was incumbent on the trade unions to keep the voters, and also keep Congressmen, from recognizing that minimum-wage laws are discriminatory against groups that already suffer from discrimination. It was seen as politically incorrect in the late 1960's to discriminate against blacks, but this was what minimum-wage laws did from the beginning. So, it was imperative that this line of reasoning be kept away from students in colleges and universities. This was why Williams' argument was devastating. Students and teachers could not refute it. It made them feel guilty, because they were pushing for legislation that imposed additional burdens on members of racial minorities who were already suffering from discrimination. The laws took away the victims' most effective tool for getting employed, and therefore getting an opportunity to prove their worth to their employers and also to coworkers.

The high unemployment rates for young adults in Greece and Spain -- in the range of 50% -- are the result of the same regulatory process. The trade unions can block offers to work for less. Members of groups that are discriminated against -- non-union workers -- cannot get employers to accept their offers to work for less. It is illegal for employers to accept these offers.
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Re: Minimum wage

Post by editor » Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:00 pm

Minimum wage is just one tooth in the cog of a machine that is intended to bankrupt us all, and reduce us to slavery, at which point any wage at all will be mute.

The argument that "people need a living wage" is great for pulling at heartstrings, but it misses the point. It is not an employer's responsibility to provide living wages. The employer has invested his time and money into a business, with the hope of making a profit. If the best he can do is break even, he's better off putting his money in the bank at 1%, instead of putting it at risk by trying to run a business. Every year thousands of businesses fail because they can't even break even.

Any time an employer's costs go up, whether it be because of rise in materials costs, higher taxes, higher wages, more regulation, or any other cause, he must raise prices to continue making a profit. As the price of the employer's product or service rises, there comes a point at which people will no longer buy it. If people won't buy at the current price, the business must reduce costs, or close its doors.

Businesses hire employees as a means to an end. The employee performs a function the business needs done. The business will pay the employee in exchange for his labor, only so long as the business benefits from the arrangement. Businesses will look for ways to reduce costs just to stay alive. Those who can will survive, the rest will fail. The survivors will continue on, but only because they found a way to conduct their business differently. This difference will often come at the expense of former employees.

Let's play a game. Let's see how many job descriptions we can think of, which either no longer exist, or have diminished in numbers to the point of near extinction. I'll start.

I'm in my fifties. When I was a kid, all these jobs were common. I even did some of them myself.

* Grocery store bagboy. There used to be boys who worked at grocery stores who bagged your groceries, put them in the cart, and wheeled the cart out to your car for you. Most even helped load the groceries in your car. If you had a big load it was customary to give the a small tip. Now we bag our own groceries, sometimes with the help of the cashier.

* Cashier. Speaking of cashiers, there used to be a lot more of them. Now we wait longer in lines, unless we're willing to use those new automated checkout kiosks. We all know where this is going, right?

* Bottle/Can stacker. I grew up in Michigan where they have a 10cent bottle/can deposit. I had a job for awhile where part of my duties were to make sure all the bottles and cans were sorted by the correct distributor, and neatly stacked out of the way where they could be picked up and taken away once a week. Thousands of kids had jobs like this, which now no longer exist. It's mostly done by machines.

* Theater usher. Ushers used to escort us to our seats.

* Elevator operator. Many buildings used to have these.

* Bathroom attendants. I always thought this one was kind of creepy, but these were not uncommon when I was a kid.

* Gas station attendant. The first self-serve stations I remember were when I was around eighteen. Before then, someone always pumped your gas. While they were at it, they checked your oil and cleaned your windshield. Stop laughing, it's true.

* Door men. Large hotels and office buildings used to have doormen. I suppose some of the largest in the big cities still do, but for the most part it's a thing of the past.

* Bellboy. Hotels used to have bellboys who would carry your bags to your room when you checked in. As with some of these other jobs, tips were customary.

* Paperboy. Kids used to have paper routes. I did. It taught me a work ethic. Do kids do this any more?

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. But there are a lot more jobs that used to be common, and simply don't exist any more. Every smalltown store employed the slow kid who swept and mopped and did what he was told, but mostly stayed out of the way. He wasn't paid much, but that was okay because he had a small apartment in the basement of old Widow Smith's house, which didn't cost much, and was close enough to work that he could walk. Now the zoning department won't let Widow Smith rent her basement any more, and she wouldn't want to anyway because she has Social Security and food stamps. But what about the slow kid? No chance he'll get a job anywhere.

So let's see how many more we can think of?

While you're thinking, it's important to remember that the biggest reason all these jobs are gone now, is because of minimum wage.

What really irks me is you've got all these Socialists (Communist-light) who point out what they perceive as failures of the free market, capitalist system. But how long has it been since we had a free market capitalist system in this country? Capitalism made America great in the early years, but government has been taxing, regulating, restricting, and meddling with it for my entire life, at an ever-increasing rate. The more they meddle, the worse it gets. The practices that are causing decline in America are the very same ones the Socialists clamor for more of the same. Minimum wage is more of the same.
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Re: Minimum wage

Post by notmartha » Thu Feb 11, 2016 12:56 pm

Increasing the minimum wage may have a positive side though - increased number of cash jobs. At least until they go cashless...
editor wrote:Let's play a game. Let's see how many job descriptions we can think of, which either no longer exist, or have diminished in numbers to the point of near extinction. I'll start.I'm in my fifties. When I was a kid, all these jobs were common. I even did some of them myself.
Ok, I'll play. These were all jobs available to teens in the eighties.

Produce pickers - Teens used to be able to make extra cash picking corn, apples, pumpkins, etc. Now it is done by machine or farmed out to migrant workers.

Wash boy - dealers used to wash every car that came in for service. Now they don't provide the service (too many people claiming damage to get free bodywork) or the positions are filled by older people.

Dishwasher at restaurant - replaced with machines

Babysitting - replaced with college educated "nannies" or "child care providers"

Lawn mowers - replaced with "landscapers"

Hmm... that's all I can think of for now.

BTW, I think EOE (equal opportunity employer) has done as much harm to the natural ebb and flow of business as minimum wage has. A healthy white degreeless young man will have a harder time finding a job than the not-so-smart, minority, or elderly.
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Re: Minimum wage

Post by editor » Wed Jul 27, 2016 4:53 pm

I just read that Donald Trump was on the Bill O'Riley show last night, and apparently said he would support a $10 minimum wage. This gave me the urge to re-visit this topic. I found the following article which appears to me to be a spoof. However, even if it is a spoof NOW, I've read enough to know it is a harbinger of things to come:

(The original article appears here: http://newsexaminer.net/food/mcdonalds- ... by-robots/)
New McDonald’s In Phoenix Run Entirely By Robots
by Darius Rubics

Phoenix, AZ — After seeing a decline in earnings for the first time in nine years, McDonald’s plans to do something no other restaurant of its kind has ever done before; open a store run entirely by robots.

The store is set to open July 4th in Phoenix, Arizona once the state-of-the-art robot remodel is complete. The restaurant will still employ a small team of human employees to insure all of the robots are working correctly, the food and cleaning supplies remain stocked along with removing the money collected by the robots. Visitors to the restaurant will see these new robots working in harmony at a speed of 50 times faster than the average McDonald’s employee, with no chance of error. If the test launch for the store is a success, people can expect to see robots working in McDonald’s restaurants all over the country and the world.

The store’s new manager, Peter Gibbons, told CNN that he has worked with the robots at a product development facility in San Francisco for the last six months and speaks highly of the machines.

“These things are great! They get their work done in a fast and orderly manner, plus they don’t ask for cigarette breaks.”

37-year-old Paul Horner, a spokesman for McDonald’s told reporters that because of the demand for a $15/hr minimum wage, the company has been playing with the idea of a restaurant run entirely by robots for years and believes their “McRobots” are the answer.

“With the high demand for a minimum wage of $15/hr and the protests getting worse every day, this is something we had to implement. Plus with the tremendous margin of human error, poor hygiene, lack of education, laziness, as well as the recent advancements in artificial intelligence it just make sense to automate our restaurants now rather than later.”

Sarah Bradley, a spokeswoman for Sock It Forward, a group that provides the homeless and those less fortunate in Arizona with brand new socks told ABC News that she approves of a $15/hr minimum wage increase.

“We see so many homeless people that work 40 hours a week, and that is just ridiculous,” Bradley said. “I think anyone not being claimed on someone else’s taxes deserves to make at least $15/hr. Some people just don’t have the physical or mental capability to get better jobs or go to college. I think in a country as great as ours, it is just sad that there are so many adults working 40 hours a week that have to worry about putting a roof over their head and food in their belly.”

Local Phoenix resident, 52-year-old Tom Downey, who has been unemployed for the last 3 years, was excited about the opening of a nearby McDonald’s until he heard about the robots.

“Now that they hire only robots, I don’t know what I can even do. I don’t have an education, a car, and now I’m not gonna even be able to get a burger job. Just the thought of having to go to the state unemployment office and stand in line with those scumbags!”

With this decision, shareholders can finally expect to see their stocks on the rise once again since employee salaries are not only cut, but eliminated. By eliminating employees, McDonald’s says it is projecting to make a full financial turnaround and see their stock (MCD) return to $105/share which was originally set back in 2014. In the U.S., first quarter comparable sales decreased 2.6% as product and promotional offers did not meet expectations. U.S. operating income for the quarter declined 11%, reflecting weak sales and the impact of restructuring and restaurant closing charges.

42-year-old Milton Waddams, an unemployed fast food worker, told reporters he is extremely disappointed by the decision to employ only robots instead of humans.

“The McDonald’s had my resume, I had already completed two job interviews there and they said I was scheduled to work once the new store opened and said they would return my phone call but they never called,” Waddams said. “I need a job I said, and I was told by Betty in HR that they have my resume on file, but they never called, and Sandra told me to talk to Bill, and then I hear of the robots instead of regular humans and that’s not what I asked for. And I need the job I told them, but there’s robots, so now I’m going to have to find another place of employment. And they were big giant robots, and I said no, no robots at McDonald’s. I could set the building on fire.”

Former grill cook, Tom Smykowski, from the original Phoenix McDonald’s location before it was shutdown for robot repairs and upgrades, is still mad about losing his job.

“You know there are people in this world who don’t have to put up with all this?” Smykowski told FOX News. “You see, that’s what you have to do. You have to use your mind and come up with some really great idea like that and you never have to work again,” but Smykowski’s friendly attitude suddenly turns to anger, “Well-well look. I already told you: I dealt with the go*damn employees so the customers would get the correct order. I have people skills; I am good at dealing with people. Can’t you understand that? What the hell is wrong with you people?”

Horner said he is excited to pave the way to a more automated workforce, hence a more reliable and affordable one.

“Robots are the future of McDonald’s in the United States and around the world,” Horner said, “Human workers want more pay and this has created giant protests which need our attention now before it is too late. Robots will decrease prices, increase productivity and make for better food.” Horner continued, “Human beings were not meant to stand and make burgers all day, filling out useless forms and listening to eight different bosses drone on about about mission statements. Now I’ve had a chance to meet with some of these robots, and boy, they are just straight shooters with upper management written all over them.”

The new robot McDonald’s is located at 7th St & McDowell Rd in downtown Phoenix. McDonald’s says that if the store is a success, 25,000 more robot-run restaurants will be built in the next three years. It is still unclear at this time what the robots look like or how customers will complete transactions as this information is being kept under strict confidentiality, but come July these questions will be answered. Will it be the right or wrong decision for McDonald’s? In the end, it will come down to what is best for the shareholders and the customer. The employees hoping to make $15/hr so they can afford basic human needs such as shelter and food; it looks like they will have to wait in line.

If you have any further questions about the robot-run establishment, McDonanld’s has setup a 24-hour robot hotline at (785) 273-0325.
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Re: Minimum wage

Post by editor » Wed Jul 27, 2016 5:01 pm

The original site for the article I just posted about robots in McDonalds restaurants has a comments section. The following comment by a poster named "Jack" was too good to not post.

Once again, the original article is here: (http://newsexaminer.net/food/mcdonalds- ... by-robots/)

Jack's comment:
Jack
April 10, 2016 at 6:48 pm

I currently own a business. I’ve owned a business of some kind since 2001. I’m 58 years old and I don’t have a college degree. Must of my education came from what college I did go to plus the time I put in at the Barns & Nobles Book Store and now Amazon books. I’m always reinventing myself because I don’t expect the government to have the money to take care of me when I’m older – and – it’s NOT the job of government to take care of me.

My father was an alcoholic who was unstable and violent and my mother abandoned us kids about 13 times during my childhood. We suffered every abuse you can name. When we didn’t have a home to live in, it was our FAMILY who took us in, NOT the government.

I left home at age 18, got married at 19 with my pregnant girlfriend and worked in a Coca Cola warehouse during the week and fast food on Friday night and weekends.

I UNDERSTAND that you can’t pay for a FAMILY on fast food wages. That’s why I STOPPED doing it. I worked two jobs and found a way to save money, get some basic higher education in a field that paid more and had more “opportunity”.

People MUST make themselves MORE valuable through self education and skills development.

The world doesn’t want your negative ATTITUDE. They aren’t willing to pay good money for bad attitude. MOST people don’t even care what COLOR you are, as long as you are competent, kind and polite and come across as having some measure of COMPETENCE at what you do.

I’ve worked for big companies and I’ve been laid off several times. I know what it feels like and the only answer is – ALWAYS EDUCATE YOURSELF AND MAKE YOURSELF MORE ‘VALUABLE’ TO – – SOCIETY.

I manufacture products in China because that is where things are made. I hope to begin manufacturing in the US within the next couple of years. I plan on automating my manufacturing process as much as possible.

WHY?
  1. . I started a business to earn money. The purpose of a business is to:
    1. solve a problem that people have
    2. get paid a price that people are willing to pay to solve the problem
  2. Eventually earn more money than I would earn working for a boss. That includes maybe even “getting RICH” some day. It’s possible that I could fail miserably and die on the streets. I take that ‘uncomfortable’ RISK and that is what I get paid for – taking a risk. I’m NOT starting my business so that I can give anyone a job. Giving a job to anyone is not my driving motivation. Taking care of my own family IS my motivation.
  3. I worked in fast food as my very first job. I’ve worked around the ‘attitude’ that some workers give to employers. Worker ‘attitude’ from low education people is the WORST part of running a business. Later in life, as I owned my own business, my greatest headache was the BS that came from my workers. I’m PAYING them to give me grief? I don’t THINK so.
Now, I have more government MANDATES that cost even more money to manage. If I make even a small mis-step, I’m open to law suites and government fines plus legal costs to defend myself. Complying and defending also consume my TIME which could be used to run my business. Bottom line: Employees are too RISKY.

Not only Fast Food workers are going to be affected. Taxes and all sorts of consulting jobs will go away. Artificial Intelligence (AI). Right now, you Google any answer you want. AI (Think IBM’s Watson) is now able to do what highly paid consultants are doing. Even lawyers (Do I hear any sobs of sympathy here? Hmmm. dead silence) are going to be affected as they already have with services such as Legal Zoom (which is not automated so much).

Elon Musk (Tesla Motors, Space-X rockets) has already written that AI and automation pose existential hazards to our society; however, that is the way things are headed. Even combat is being automated with AI and unmanned ships and air craft. Look it up on YouTube.

The world is changing just like it did at the beginning of the Industrial age. The US used to be the “China” of the world as we developed machines. Europe was in a panic as their jobs went “over seas” to the America.

The cotton gin and automated harvesting made manual labor in the cotton fields obsolete. Does anyone want THAT job back? (I hear silence).

Each person has a moral and FAMILY obligation to constantly be improving themselves. I did and still do and I’m almost age 60.

I’ve lived in China and I can say this: The Chinese are hell bent on being BETTER than the US in EVERY way. They study hard, learn to speak English, watch US TV and news, read classical western literature and are now transitioning from producing FAKE products to actually INNOVATING new ideas. Who’s the world leader in the small drone market? Chinese. NOT Americans.

While Americans sleep, they study and work. While low wage people refuse to rise up and better themselves, Chinese learn a new skill, read a new book, study the success of American businesses and now engage in self improvement and positive mental attitudes of success.

If YOU as an American want to survive what’s coming, then you need to REINVENT yourself each day. Always educate yourself, your kids and also avoid debt.

If you are low income and no savings, then as a family and community, you need to stick together and work together to support each other in owning a home debt free – even if 3 generations have to live under one roof and working 18 hours a day paying the mortgage off early. Put your kids through some kind of further education. Pool your resources.
  • Do you need a university degree to succeed? NO! I don’t have one and I’m doing quite well.
  • Do you need to be WHITE to succeed? ONLY if you have it in your mind that being non-white is going to hold YOU back.
  • Do you think any Amazon.com customer cares one hoot about your skin color?
  • Do you know how EASY it is to start your own brand of anything using “White Label” (i.e. generic) manufacturing and then develop your own brand? I do it. I learned how from the Internet. What do you think all of those ‘famous’ brands do? hehehe
Why don’t YOU start MANUFACTURING something and sell it? It’s NOT complex. Chinese do small manufacturing from what is no more than the size of a one-car garage and then as they grow, they get something larger. Many people get self righteous and say that’s undignified, sweatshop labor – not if YOU own the business and you want to get ahead.

Bottom line: The survivors and winners in the new age are going to use their CREATIVE abilities to solve new problems. Unskilled labor is going the way of the dinasaur. Extinct. Adapt or die. Government can’t pay uneducated people to not work because people like me aren’t going to settle for it. At some point, it makes more sense for me to stop working and creating and just retire. Take my my bank debit card and do cash withdrawals from an ATM machine in another country very cheaply or just hang out in the US.

If I am forced to remain and pay for uneducated, apathetic people in society, then I’m gonna be their DADDY. If anyone is above a certain age and hasn’t taken advantage of FREE education, cheap books via Amazon and hasn’t bettered themselves with some new skills, then that person is PROVEN that they are INCOMPETENT to manage their own lives.

YOU are responsible for your prosperity; NOT ME.

I didn’t wake up at 4:00 AM this morning looking for a new way to GIVE YOU a job. That was never my purpose for owning a business and it never will be.

FINAL QUESTIONS:
  • What’s the last book you read?
  • What’s the latest skill that you’ve developed?
  • What’s the last culture that you’ve tried to learn about? Language to learn?
  • How positive is your personality – even in the face of difficulties?
NOBODY was ever guaranteed health, wealth and happiness. Everyone DESERVING it and CREATING it are two matters.

Wishing everyone the best, wherever their lives take them – rich or poor.

I just happened across this web site and won’t be monitoring it for comments.
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Re: Minimum wage

Post by editor » Tue Apr 09, 2019 6:48 pm

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notmartha
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Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2013 1:16 pm

Re: Minimum wage

Post by notmartha » Thu Apr 11, 2019 12:04 pm

LOL...magic boats...what a great visual!
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